Everybody Dies, But Not Everybody Lives

Does it ring a bell with you — In your first years of college, there’s a splurge out on earned pennies. Then the socially defined ‘norms’ of establishing stability set in, bursting the bubble. Once the rigid 9-5 job set in, you started saving and even walked away from your own moments of escapades. And time trickled away. Days passed by, months passed by and years passed by. When on the verge of a possible promotion, you rationalized all dream procrastinations, making defined norms of stability a security key. Your passion and youth fades out, and your job takes over every segment of your being. Your dreams are set aside for a filled wallets without emotions…

I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.

This is one of the most common regrets people have before they die, recorded in a collection of the most common regrets[1] by Bonnie Ware, a nurse of terminally ill patients with chronic conditions.

Unfulfilling life leads to more regrets

Many people seem to be living in a trance state of rigid routine lifestyles accumulated over years. These routines lay out a perception of stability, which amounts to an illusion in a fluctuating world. Bland life variety comes from changing television channels or ears out for latest celebrity or politician scandals doing their roundabouts.

Many dreams are unfulfilled due to the fact of not choosing to pursue them. Overworking leads to missing interaction with children and partners. Hoarded capsules of resentment and bitterness all through life because of lacking courage to express the true feelings. Settling for a mediocrity and essence of existence fades out true capability.

Many long for happiness in its true essence, but the fear of change comes with a false presentation of contentment to others and themselves.

Friendships and connections slip away once life activities capture them in a net of economic hubs and activities. Beneficial old friends come in the limelight in their final moments, and there is regret about not giving friends the necessary attention and time.

Regret comes mainly in the form of what we did not do, and not about what we did

The journey of our soul is an intrepid myriad of a maze with tidal waves life experiences blended in bouts of hurdles and storms. When we are in our twenties we are set in a robust mode to take the launch into worldwide possibilities. There is an outburst of passion and energy to explore every hidden corner of the universe. Exploring should have no limits.

To live life to the fullest, allow changes in the present moment

Decide on what is of importance to you. Focus on yourself, not what others desire you to be. Everyone has an opinion, even society can impose on your ambitions, yet every breath you take is your own life moments. Once you focus on yourself, pieces of the life puzzle come together.

Your ambitions matter, don’t aim to settle down in early stages of life on an illusion of ‘stability’. Take all the risks you need, do not postpone dreams. There might be danger in risks, but remember that every reward has a risk attached to it. Looking back on years that passed by, the deepest regrets come from risks and challenges not taken.

Your past is an important thread to reflect on the lesson learned to step forward into the future. Plan your future, reflect on your past for lessons learned, but live in your present. By being anxious about the future of struggling with something that happened in the past obstacles are sprouted  in living life to the fullest. Live in the present and do not get straddle in ‘Why did I?’, “Why didn’t I’ syndrome.[2]

There will always be people in your life sphere pointing out streams of your failures. Success comes from persisting through failures. So take action on your ideas creatively, mindfully and with awareness. [3]

And don’t forget— express your love to your friends and family often.

Reference

[1] Regrets of the Dying, Bonnie Ware
[2] Living in the Moment is Key to Happiness, Planet of Susccess
[3] Journey Of My Soul, Tu Nokwe

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